PHP Contact Form Code

Download contact

With the features

  • Vcard generation and emailing
  • best practive for server side validation in plain php

 

 

 

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CTO 24/7 Open Positions

Senior Java Web Developer

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years

Required Skills:

  • J2SE/J2EE, Struts, JSF, JSP, Java Servlets
  • Experience of Spring framework is essential
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Senior Business Intelligence (BI) Developer

Required Experience

  • 7 – 10 Years

Required Skills:

  • Excellent knowledge of Informatica Power Center, ETL Processes and Job Development ExperienceandTSQL is essential
  • DBA and Database Performance Tuning
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Senior .Net Web Develop

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years

Required Skills:

  • .NET Web (ASP.Net), C#, Integration Concepts, Web Services, Team Foundation System
  • Experience of MVC, Entity Framework is essential
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills

*

Senior .Net Desktop Developer

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years

Required Skills:

  • Working experience on .NET Win forms, SQL, XML as Data Store is essential
  • Agile, Web Services, Team Foundation System
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Software Analysis and Assurance Senior

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years

Required Skills:

  • Exposure of Automated Testing is essential
  • Visual Studio 2013, C# or VB dot NET or any scripting language, Team Foundation System, Microsoft Test Manager
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Senior .Net Web Developer (MS Dynamics)

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years

Required Skills:

  • NET Web (ASP.Net), C#, MVC, Entity Framework, Integration Concepts, Web Services, Team Foundation System
  • Exposure of Integration with MS Dynamics will be a plus
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Siebel Configurator

Required Experience

  • 6 – 8 Years
  • 2 – 4 Years in Siebel

Required Skills:

  • Siebel Configurator
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills

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Sample DB for tutorials

restore following dump

dumps

download and unzip and restore sql duumps for practice

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Cakephp 2.5.5 Installation Notes

 

  • Step One download and install wamp
  • Download cakephp 2.5.5 zip file from here
  • make a folder say cake in www
  • unzip contents of zip file in cake folder
  • access localhost/cakephp in web browser
  • If you see a dull page then you need to enable rewrite module See Instructions here
  • now you should see a colourful page
  • like this

cake installation

  • open 
  • APP/Config/core.php

    search for salt you would see something like this

/**
* A random string used in security hashing methods.
*/
Configure::write('Security.salt', 'DYhG93b0qyJfIxfs2guVoUubWwvniR2G0FgaC9mi');

/**
* A random numeric string (digits only) used to encrypt/decrypt strings.
*/
Configure::write('Security.cipherSeed', '76859309657453542496749683645');

 

change salt and cipherSeed values like this

 

'your value here'

/**
* A random string used in security hashing methods.
*/
Configure::write('Security.salt', 'your value here');

/**
* A random numeric string (digits only) used to encrypt/decrypt strings.
*/
Configure::write('Security.cipherSeed', 'your value here');

 

  • Rename APP/Config/database.php.default to APP/Config/database.php

 

set values as

public $default = array(
'datasource' => 'Database/Mysql',
'persistent' => false,
'host' => 'localhost',
'login' => 'root',
'password' => '',
'database' => 'outsourcing',
'prefix' => '',
//'encoding' => 'utf8',
);

you are good to go if your database name is outsourcing

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Personal incomplete slides

Slides

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Facebook group for Web Technologies

Join this FB group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/427568144050641/

also invite your other class mates

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Web Technologies, Course Handbook


COMSATS

CIIT, Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore

        

COURSE HANDBOOK

 

1.

Course Title    

WEB TECHNOLOGIES

2.

Course Code    

CSD337

3.

Credit Hours

4(3,1)

4.

Semester    

Fall 2014

5.

Resource Person

Muhammad Usman Akram

6.

Supporting Team Members

Haad Bodla

7.

Contact Hours (Theory)

3 hours per week

8.

Contact Hours (Lab)

3 hours per week

9.

Office Hours    

Mon-Fri 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

10.

Course Introduction

This course aims to provide the students with theoretical and practical knowledge required to design develop and deploy the web based applications which include the database connectivity. At the end of this course students should be able to make their developed site a better one in the search engines ratings.

11.

Learning Objectives

In this course students will be taught the fundamentals of Web-Technologies. Different models of Web-Technologies will be introduced.

This course contributes to the development of the following capabilities:

Enabling Knowledge: the operation, implementation and performance of modern Web Applications typically focusing Web 2.0, and the relative merits and suitability of each for complex applications.

  1. Problem Solving: Ability to model, abstract, and implement efficient web solutions in a complex system environment.
  2. Critical Analysis: Ability to compare, contrast, and evaluate the key trade-offs between multiple approaches to web application design and implementations, and identify appropriate design choices when solving real-world problems.
  3. Communication: Ability to motivate and explain efficient programming concepts, relevant alternatives and decision recommendations, in written form, to IT specialists, Computer Scientists, and Software Engineers.
  4. Responsibility: Ability to apply relevant standards and ethical considerations to the design and implementation of efficient software solutions.


 

12.

Course Contents

Overview of Protocols mainly TCP/IP and HTTP; Overview of 3-tier Architecture; Web Based Applications development; Front End Development Tools and Languages like HTML; DHTML; CSS and Java Script. Cookies and Sessions; XML Processing; JSON; AJAX; Data Intensive websites; Database support for Web Engineering; MVC Framework; Content Management Systems; RESTful Services

13.

Lecture Schedule

Week 1: Lecture 01 Internet and WWW

Week 2: Lecture 02 HTML and CSS Basics

Week 2: Lecture 03 More Basic HTML and CSS

Week 3: Lecture 04 Page Sections and the CSS Box Model

Week 3: Lecture 05 Floating and Positioning

Week 4: Lecture 06 Basic PHP for Server Side Programming

Week 4: Lecture 07 More PHP for Server Side Programming

Week 5: Lecture 08 HTML Forms

Week 5: Lecture 09 Server Browser Interactions

Week 6: Lecture 10 Form Validations and Regular Expression

Week 6: Lecture 11 Advanced PHP and Web Frameworks

Week 7: Lecture 12 Basic JavaScript for Client Side Programming

Week 7: Lecture 13 More JavaScript and DOM

Week 8: Lecture 14 Object-Oriented JavaScript

Week 8: Lecture 15 Advanced JavaScript and DOM

Week 9: Lecture 16 Manipulating DOM with JavaScript

Week 9: Lecture 17 DOM Events

Week 10: Lecture 18 Advanced Events and Client Side Validations

Week 10: Lecture 19 Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)

Week 11: Lecture 20 Pragmatic XML

Week 11: Lecture 21 Web Services

Week 12: Lecture 22 Rich Client Side and RIA

Week 12: Lecture 23 Cookies and Sessions

Week 13: Lecture 24 Mashups

Week 13: Lecture 25 Web Security Basics

Week 14: Lecture 26 Web Engineering Basics

Week 14: Lecture 27 Cloud Computing and Semantic Web

15.

Text Books

Meloni, J. C. (2013) Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours, 9th edition, Sams Publishing.

16.

Recommended Books

Pan, J.Z., Staab, S., Abmann, U., Ebert, J., Zhao, Y. (2013) Ontology-Driven Software Development, Springer.

Puntambekar, A.A. (2009) Web Technologies, Technical Publications.

17.

Detail of Teaching and Assessment

The learning hours for this module are made up of the teaching contact hours as well as the students’ private study hours. Further details and timings will be notified later.

Type Details:

Teaching Contact Hours 2 Lectures/week (1.5 hours each)

Instructors Office Hours 2 hours/week

Lab Contact Hours 2 Lab Session/week (1.5 hours each)

Students’ Private Study hours 4 hours/week

Details and timings for the assessment of this module are as follows:

 

The minimum pass marks for this course shall be 50%. Students obtaining less than 50% marks in this course (Theory or Practical) shall be deemed to have failed. The letter grades, credit points, and percentage marks shall be as follows:

Grades

Letter Grade

Credit Points

Percentage Marks

A

( Excellent)

4.0

90and above

A-

 

3.7

85-89

B+

 

3.3

80-84

B

(Good)

3.0

75-79

B-

 

2.7

70-74

C+

 

2.3

65-69

C

(Average)

2.0

60-64

C-

 

1.7

55-59

D

(Minimum passing)

1.3

50-54

F

(Failing)

0.0

Less than 50

18.

Format of Assignment

Assignments are usually submitted on my personal portal usmanlive.com/portal

19.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the failure to credit the writings or ideas of another person that you have used in your own work. In such cases you are, deliberately or inadvertently, attempting to pass their work off as your own. Plagiarism is a serious offence, and can carry severe consequences, from failure of this module to deregistration from the course. You may also commit plagiarism by failing to reference your own work that you have already used in a previously, or by failing to credit the input of other students on group projects.

It is your responsibility to ensure that you understand plagiarism and how to avoid it. The following recommendations can help you in avoiding plagiarism.

  • Be sure to record your sources when taking notes, and to cite these if you use ideas or, especially, quotations from the original source. Be particularly careful if you are cutting and pasting information between two documents, and ensure that references are not lost in the process.
    • Be sensible in referencing ideas – commonly held views that are generally accepted do not always require acknowledgment to particular sources. However, it is best to be safe to avoid plagiarism.
    • Be particularly careful with quotations and paraphrasing.
    • Be aware that technology is now available at CIIT and elsewhere that can automatically detect plagiarism.
    • Ensure that all works used are referenced appropriately in the text of your work and fully credited in your bibliography.
    • If in doubt, ask for further guidance from your Course Organizer.

    The material that you submit for assessment, whether in an answer script in a written examination or as assessed coursework, must be your own unaided work. Cheating in written examinations and plagiarism in assessed coursework are examination offences.

    Plagiarism in assessed coursework - this is the use or presentation of the work of another person, including another student, as your own work (or as part of your own work) without acknowledging the source. Plagiarism therefore includes submitting the work of someone else as your own, and extensive copying from someone else’s work in your own paper or report.

    Brief quotations from the published or unpublished work of other persons may be used, but must always be clearly indicated by being placed inside quotation marks, with the source indicated in some way, and the work listed in the bibliography at the end of your own piece of work.

    It can also be plagiarism to summarize another person’s ideas or judgments without reference to the source.

    Copying material from web pages without acknowledgement is plagiarism.

    Copying programs (for example from the Internet) without explanation of where they are from or how much you have modified the programs is also plagiarism.

    Copying from another student (with or without their consent) is plagiarism and both parties will be subject to investigation and possible penalty.

    Do not copy and do not allow others to copy from you.

    When you are taking notes for a paper or piece of coursework, it is important to include all the sources you have used, and to indicate any quotations so that you can make the necessary references when you come to write the report/assignment/essay etc. “Unconscious plagiarism”, including an un-attributed quotation because you did not identify quotations in your notes, is as much an examination offence as deliberate plagiarism, and will be dealt with in the same way as any other examination offence.

    ‘Turnitin’ Academic Plagiarism Detection Service

    All final project reports are checked for plagiarism using the plagiarism detection service ‘Turnitin’. Reports are checked against the web and other digital archives to determine how much of it is copied from other sources. Clearly it is ok if some of the text comes from other sources (providing the source is referenced) but the majority of the text should be your own and you will be heavily penalized and potentially subject of a plagiarism investigation if not. Please note that other coursework may be run through the ‘turnitin’ system at the module organizer’s discretion.

    The Google test

    To ensure against plagiarism, all assessed coursework is subject to the “Google Test”, which works as follows.

    Sentences and phrases from your work are typed into Google, which quickly finds material that has been copied from any web page. Any work containing material found on a Web page will be deemed to have failed the Google Test, unless it has been properly referenced and quoted.

    We strongly recommend that you apply the Google Test to your own work before you submit it, to make sure that you have not “accidentally” included words from any web pages. If you find any sections copied from web pages in your work, you should make sure that you remove the offending sections before you submit or make sure that they are properly referenced.

20.

Attendance Policy

Every student must attended 80% of the lectures/seminars delivered in this course and 80% of the prescribed practical/laboratory sessions. The students falling short of required percentage of attendance of lectures/seminars/practical/laboratory work, etc., shall not be allowed to appear in the terminal examination of this course and shall be treated as having failed this course.

21.

Conduct

CIIT has high expectations of student behaviour. It is expected that students will help to maintain a pleasant atmosphere suitable for serious study throughout their programme of study. Any behaviour that prevents other students from studying will result in disciplinary action by the University. Persistent offenders will be referred to concerned committee for further disciplinary action and possible deregistration.

Two issues requiring particular attention are noise disruption and mobile phones. Students should not distract others by talking during taught classes (lectures, labs, tutorials, exercises classes, etc.). Students using the labs should be aware of others around them, and should keep any discussion to a reasonable level.

Mobile phones should always be switched off during taught classes, in the Library, and in any tests or examinations. Any student whose mobile phone rings during a taught class or in the Library may be asked to leave. Any student whose mobile phone rings during a test or examination will be referred to concerned committee for disciplinary action. This may lead to a mark of zero being awarded for that particular assessment, and more serious penalties for a subsequent offence.

22.

Procedures for CSD337 Module

a) Coursework/Assignment Submissions:

Coursework is usually submitted electronically. When the work is required to be submitted in this way, you have until midnight on the advertised submission date to submit the work. Please note, you must submit the work electronically in the specified file format. When group coursework is to be submitted electronically, a representative of each group (the group leader) should be chosen for submission. If there is any doubt, please contact the Course Organizer BEFORE the submission date.

Every piece of written coursework must have a correctly completed front cover sheet which you must sign in order to declare that it is your own work. Please contact course organizer for the template of front cover sheet. Paper submissions must be made in person to the specified person during office contact hours. Do not give coursework to any other member of staff as we will not accept responsibility for anything that is not submitted properly. Especially, do not push work under offices doors as it is quite likely to be picked up and disposed of by the cleaning staff.

Students, who miss the coursework deadline because of extenuating circumstances, can still submit their work (subject to the approval of course organizer). In this case the submission will be logged as “Late Submission” and will automatically be penalized.

b) Examinations:

For the explanations, students will be assessed according to clear understanding of concepts and correct usage of technical information in their responses. For essays and assignments, the relevance of information and the coherence of the details would be assessed along with importance and credits for proper examples. For practical assignments, students will be rewarded according to the proper usage of features and tools regarding that assignment, extra credit will be given to students who show more technical learning.

c) Penalties for Late Submission of Coursework

If you fail to submit coursework on time you will be penalized on the following scale:

10% per day will be lost from your overall mark. (For purposes of calculating penalty – each period of up to 24 hours after the initial submission is counted as 1 day). However, this will be capped at 30% (3 days) maximum penalty. Normally you will not be allowed to submit after the cut-off date. Saturdays and Sundays count as periods late when calculating the penalty.

d) Request for Extensions to Coursework Submission Dates

If you have any extenuating circumstances that will result in your coursework being late or you having to miss a scheduled lab session, you must report them to the admin office within 10 days of the coursework deadline.

e) Extenuating Circumstances

Extenuating circumstances normally mean circumstances beyond your control (e.g. illness, death of a close relative etc). Losing memory sticks, computer problems or theft of laptops will not count since you should always have backup copies elsewhere; printer problems will also not count as you should allow enough time to get the printing done even if there are problems.

Any such claim MUST be supported by documentary evidence e.g. an original medical certificate covering the date(s) in question, accompanied by an extenuating circumstances formal statement by the student. Any claim will not be considered, under any circumstances, without supporting documents.

Such an authorized absence will allow you to have an experiment rescheduled or coursework submission date shifted by an appropriate amount. However, if the new submission date is likely to exceed the published coursework cut-off date then you may be asked to do a different piece of work to the other students on that course. Also, overall end-of-semester deadlines for marks cannot be exceeded. Each case will be looked at on its individual merits.

Please note that it is your own responsibility to submit claims for extenuating circumstances and students with extenuating circumstances cannot be given extra marks. Marks will only be given for the work actually produced, not what might have been done if extenuating circumstances had not arisen.

f) Private Study

In addition to the timetabled classes and labs etc., students should plan to spend at least 4 hours per week on private study for this module. A variety of sources of material may be recommended: lecture slides and/or notes (for information tailored towards the individual module concerned), text-books (for basic, factual information), journals (for in-depth exploration of recent research trends), and conference proceedings (for cutting-edge research in progress). Some of this scientific material may be authored by the module teaching staff.

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FYP submission

Open

https://www.turnitin.com/newuser_join.asp?svr=5&session-id=31da539e1733e5d7e2e1de35f21aa569&lang=en_us&r=69.3051412448511

class ID: 8194090

enrollment password: 123456

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Web Slides

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Final Paper Course

  • Process Scheduling algorithms
  • Calculating waiting and response time
  • Deadlocks
  • recovery from deadlocks
  • Banker’s Theorem (Problem Solving)
  • Article 8.5 Paging from Silberchatz book (Complete Section)
  • Page Replacement algorithms
  • Interrupt Handling
  • Block Selection algorithms for swapping processes in memory. (best fit, first fit etc )

Silberschatz Operating System Concepts 9th txtbk

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